Late last year I wrote about FTSE behaviour come December. No, not playing under-the-table toe-tennis with the cutie from accounts at the work Christmas party, rather what the London Stock Exchange’s biggie share index – the FTSE 100 – tends to do come the silly season.

I looked at data from the past nine years and found that on each occasion the FTSE 100 finished December higher than it began. Some years marginally higher – 24.4 points up in 2007 – and some years quite substantially higher – 371.6 points in 2010.

Here’s the data again for those who missed it.

 

28th Nov 2003 4342.60 to 31st Dec 2003 4476.90 - Finished December up 134.30 points
30th Nov 2004 4703.20 to 31st Dec 2004 4814.30 - Finished December up 111.10 points
30th Nov 2005 5423.20 to 30th Dec 2005 5618.80 - Finished December up 195.60 points
30th Nov 2006 6048.80 to 29th Dec 2006 6220.80 - Finished December up 172.00 points
30th Nov 2007 6432.50 to 31st Dec 2007 6456.90 - Finished December up 24.40 points
28th Nov 2008 4288.00 to 31st Dec 2008 4434.20 - Finished December up 146.20 points
30th Nov 2009 5190.70 to 31st Dec 2009 5412.90 - Finished December up 222.20 points
30th Nov 2010 5528.30 to 31st Dec 2010 5899.90 - Finished December up 371.60 points
30th Nov 2011 5505.40 to 30th Dec 2011 5572.28 - Finished December up 66.88 points

 

So on to 2012. What did the FTSE do in December of a year marked by European Austerity, further world economic meltdown slowdown and a looming US fiscal cliff, yep you guessed it, it dropped! No, hang on, it rose again. But how can that be? Damn, this is all sooo confusing.

The FTSE ended play on 30th November 2012 at 5866.82 and then went on to add a further 30.99 points during the month of December, finishing 2012 at 5897.81 points.

Okay, it didn’t make me rich but it did make me money. And in a financial world were sure things are almost impossible to find, backing an outcome that has happened 10 years straight is not a bad place to start.

Here’s to a fiscally fabulous 2013. Thanks again for dropping by.

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